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Subject Files

 Sub-Series

Collection Summary

From the Collection:

Correspondence, speeches, articles, reports, business records, photographs, film strips, and printed matter (1933-1984) document Dr. Julius Schreiber's professional psychiatric career, notably his work leading mental hygiene programs at Camp Callan, California, and his efforts to promote racial and ethnic cooperation, social harmony, and democratic values as a founder and director of the National Institute of Social Research. The collection is organized chronologically by the institutions where he worked and principally reflects Schreiber's original filing structure. Correspondence appears throughout the collection and, in parts, extensively illustrates Schreiber's activities. Reports generated during his military work and by the NISR summarize the collected efforts of Schreiber's two principle endeavors. Publications by the army and NISR comprise much of the printed matter, mainly collected by Schreiber for reference purposes. There are relatively few photographs, mostly depicting people and locations involved with the NISR. Personal and biographical information, such as military orders documenting his service and some personal and group photographs, is limited and is spread throughout the collection.

Series 1, Stockton State Hospital, contains a scattering of documentation from Dr. Schreiber's time at Stockton State Hospital. His writings subseries (1941-1943) reflects his interest in insulin shock therapy and its application in the treatment of stuttering. Patient records also document these topics, along with some brief work on anthropometry. These records are restricted according to HMD's access to personal health information policy.

Series 2 covers both Dr. Schreiber's psychiatric work and mental hygiene programs at Camp Callan, California. Army regulations and manuals, reports, guides, and outlines document the techniques and subject matter developed for troop mental orientation to warfare and combat. The few articles he wrote from this period complement his clinical and educational activities. Dr. Schreiber also retained copies of psychological evaluations made at Camp Callan, organized by patient name and by diagnoses. These records are restricted according to HMD's access to personal health information policy.

Series 3 holds numerous reports and subject files which give insight into the sources that Schreiber used in formulating discussion guides. A large section is devoted to various discussion guides and presentations which illustrate the range of information that the Orientation Branch believed needed addressing. Schreiber's writings during this period reveal his interest in orientation and education but also presage his later work on social justice, as in "Prejudice -- roadblock to progress." Correspondence fully documents this period, including his transition from the Orientation Branch to the National Jewish Welfare Board during his last few months in the Army.

Series 4, National Institute of Social Research is the largest and most complete part of the collection. Correspondence provides an almost daily account of the National Institute of Social Research's entire two-year journey. The complete letterbook copies of letters sent from NISR headquarters along with 11 folders of Dr. Schreiber's personal correspondence are the most comprehensive subseries. Several other subseries and topics are covered by correspondence in part. Administrative records are incomplete. Publications, in the form of periodicals, pamphlets, posters, and other promotional objects, represent the public face of the NISR. Included with this material are many original drawings and cartoons which were published as illustrations. The six community discussion councils are well represented by reports and in subject files, which also address concepts of community and the development of discussion techniques.

Series 5, Private Practice, covers a large period of time but offers little research value. Correspondence is sparse and of little professional importance except those portions which appear in the subject files. The most informative segments of this series are devoted to Dr. Schreiber's involvement with the Menninger Foundation and with the Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry, both of which are concentrated during the late 1940s and early 1950s.

Dates

  • 1942-1950

Extent

From the Collection: 18.29 Linear Feet (20 boxes + map drawers)

Language of Materials

From the Collection:

Collection materials primarily in English

Access Restrictions

Collection is restricted. Portions of the collection are restricted according to HMD's Access to Health Information of Individuals policy. Contact the Reference Staff for information regarding access. For access to the policy and application form, please visit https://www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/manuscripts/phi.pdf.

Collection Summary

From the Collection:

Correspondence, speeches, articles, reports, business records, photographs, film strips, and printed matter (1933-1984) document Dr. Julius Schreiber's professional psychiatric career, notably his work leading mental hygiene programs at Camp Callan, California, and his efforts to promote racial and ethnic cooperation, social harmony, and democratic values as a founder and director of the National Institute of Social Research. The collection is organized chronologically by the institutions where he worked and principally reflects Schreiber's original filing structure. Correspondence appears throughout the collection and, in parts, extensively illustrates Schreiber's activities. Reports generated during his military work and by the NISR summarize the collected efforts of Schreiber's two principle endeavors. Publications by the army and NISR comprise much of the printed matter, mainly collected by Schreiber for reference purposes. There are relatively few photographs, mostly depicting people and locations involved with the NISR. Personal and biographical information, such as military orders documenting his service and some personal and group photographs, is limited and is spread throughout the collection.

Series 1, Stockton State Hospital, contains a scattering of documentation from Dr. Schreiber's time at Stockton State Hospital. His writings subseries (1941-1943) reflects his interest in insulin shock therapy and its application in the treatment of stuttering. Patient records also document these topics, along with some brief work on anthropometry. These records are restricted according to HMD's access to personal health information policy.

Series 2 covers both Dr. Schreiber's psychiatric work and mental hygiene programs at Camp Callan, California. Army regulations and manuals, reports, guides, and outlines document the techniques and subject matter developed for troop mental orientation to warfare and combat. The few articles he wrote from this period complement his clinical and educational activities. Dr. Schreiber also retained copies of psychological evaluations made at Camp Callan, organized by patient name and by diagnoses. These records are restricted according to HMD's access to personal health information policy.

Series 3 holds numerous reports and subject files which give insight into the sources that Schreiber used in formulating discussion guides. A large section is devoted to various discussion guides and presentations which illustrate the range of information that the Orientation Branch believed needed addressing. Schreiber's writings during this period reveal his interest in orientation and education but also presage his later work on social justice, as in "Prejudice -- roadblock to progress." Correspondence fully documents this period, including his transition from the Orientation Branch to the National Jewish Welfare Board during his last few months in the Army.

Series 4, National Institute of Social Research is the largest and most complete part of the collection. Correspondence provides an almost daily account of the National Institute of Social Research's entire two-year journey. The complete letterbook copies of letters sent from NISR headquarters along with 11 folders of Dr. Schreiber's personal correspondence are the most comprehensive subseries. Several other subseries and topics are covered by correspondence in part. Administrative records are incomplete. Publications, in the form of periodicals, pamphlets, posters, and other promotional objects, represent the public face of the NISR. Included with this material are many original drawings and cartoons which were published as illustrations. The six community discussion councils are well represented by reports and in subject files, which also address concepts of community and the development of discussion techniques.

Series 5, Private Practice, covers a large period of time but offers little research value. Correspondence is sparse and of little professional importance except those portions which appear in the subject files. The most informative segments of this series are devoted to Dr. Schreiber's involvement with the Menninger Foundation and with the Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry, both of which are concentrated during the late 1940s and early 1950s.

Creator

Collecting Area Details

Part of the Archives and Modern Manuscripts Collection Collecting Area

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