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Charles Frederic Gell Papers

 Collection
Identifier: MS C 389

Abstract

Biographical data, correspondence, papers, talks, and technical data, 1938-73. Dr. Charles Gell's chief contributions to aviation medicine dealt with the hazards of cosmic rays in space flight, the development of methods for quick freezing of mammals, and the problems of accelleration stress in flight.

Dates

  • 1938-1973

Extent

3.36 Linear Feet (8 MS boxes)

Creator

Physical Location

Materials stored onsite. History of Medicine Division. National Library of Medicine

Language of Materials

Collection materials primarily in English

Restrictions

Collection is not restricted. Contact the Reference Staff for information regarding access.

Copyright and Re-use Information

Donor's copyrights were transferred to the public domain. Archival collections often contain mixed copyrights; while NLM is the owner of the physical items, permission to examine collection materials is not an authorization to publish. These materials are made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. It is the user's responsibility to research and understand any applicable copyright and re-publication rights not allowed by fair use. NLM does not grant permissions to publish.

Privacy Information

Archives and manuscript collections may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations. Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in any collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications for which the National Library of Medicine assumes no responsibility.

Biographical Note

Charles Frederic Gell (1907-1980) was born in Chicago, Illinois on June 16. He was a highly decorated naval officer before entering private industry with Chance-Vought Corporation and LTV Aerospace Corporation. He received his M.D. degree from Loyola University School of Medicine in 1936 and was commissioned in the Navy Medical Corps the following year. He was designated a flight surgeon by the Navy in 1938, by the Army in 1939, and became a naval aviator in 1945. Assigned to the Navy's Bureau of Aeronautics in 1943, he directed development of improved oxygen apparatus, flight clothing, survival and rescue equipment, and equipment for counteracting the effects of high acceleration.

After World War II, Gell became executive officer at the Naval School of Aviation Medicine in Pensacola, FL., where he organized the first radiological defense course and was instructor in the fields of aviation physiology, nuclear physics and medical aspects of nuclear energy. He moved to the Aviation Medical Acceleration Laboratory in Johnsville PA. in 1949, then became director of the Air Crew Equipment Laboratory in Philadelphia in 1955. From 1951-1956, Gell was lecturer and assistant professor of aviation physiology at the University of Pennsylvania's Graduate School of Medicine, at the same time earning an M.S. and Doctor of Medical Science for his work physiology. Lastly, he joined the Office of Naval Research in 1958 and retired from the military in 1960 as a captain.

Gell's work with LTV Aerospace Corp. centered on his research with physiologists, psychologists and engineers developing and enhancing man's capabilities in space. His pioneering work included use of the human centrifuge to produce accelerations and gravity forces encountered in space vehicles, developing high-altitude oxygen systems, and contributing to the development of the full-pressure suit, forerunner to the space suit worn by astronauts. He was also the first to publish research on the hazards of cosmic rays, as well as principle investigator in the use of the supine seat for space flight and creator of studies exploring explosive decompression in space vehicles. He left LTV in 1966 and joined the Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory in Groton, CT. He continued his research and teaching activities into the 1970s, as well as serving on several federal and international committees.

Dr. Gell's awards include the John Jeffries Award of the American Institute of the Aeronautical Sciences, the Theodore Lyster Award of the Aero Medical Association, and the Melbourne W. Boynton Award for space medicine from the American Astronautical Society.

Collection Summary

Biographical data, correspondence, papers, talks, and technical data, 1938-73. Dr. Gell's chief contributions to aviation medicine dealt with the hazards of cosmic rays in space flight, the development of methods for quick freezing of mammals, and the problems of accelleration stress in flight.

Abstract

Biographical data, correspondence, papers, talks, and technical data, 1938-73. Dr. Charles Gell's chief contributions to aviation medicine dealt with the hazards of cosmic rays in space flight, the development of methods for quick freezing of mammals, and the problems of accelleration stress in flight.

Physical Location

Materials stored onsite. History of Medicine Division. National Library of Medicine

Provenance

Acquired in 1981.

General

Processed by
HMD Staff
Encoded by
Dan Jenkins
Title
Finding Aid to the Charles Frederic Gell Papers1938-1973
Status
Unverified Partial Draft
Author
HMD Staff
Date
2000
Language of description
English
Script of description
Code for undetermined script
Language of description note
Finding aid is written in English
Edition statement
Version 1.0

Collecting Area Details

Part of the Archives and Modern Manuscripts Collection Collecting Area

Contact:
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